DIY TUTORIAL: Elastic Floral Headband

So, I promised this tutorial in my other post, and here it is!

I actually made this a while ago. I have always loved flowers and the child/fairylike quality of floral headresses. Even sports people like Stephanie Gilmore are wearing them for victory. Or perhaps you prefer Florence+The Machine or New Yorker

I looked around in a lot of stores during December last year, but I couldn’t find one I liked in terms of style and price.

Plus, most of them were either hard headbands or the wire wreath (such as Kelli Murray’s or Art in Our Blood’s) These looked fine, but I find that elastic headbands are much more comfortable and stay on your head better. So I decided to make my own.

Floral Headband Tutorial

Tools and Materials: Fake flowers

Strip of Fabric that matches your hair colour (in my case, black) or Thick, wide Ribbon

Thin Elastic (again matching your hair colour)

Before we start: So, this headband is basically a circle which involves a non-elastic part with flowers sewn onto it (This is the strip of fabric) and an elastic part which will help it stay on your head.

This Tutorial can be summed up in 4 simple steps:

  1. Get fake Flowers
  2. Cut stems off flowers
  3. Sew flowers to non stretchy strip of fabric (fabric should match haircolour)
  4. Attach Elastic band to fit your head

In case you want better instruction I’ve written out what I did in more detail:

The elastic part will be made by taking a rectangular piece of fabric with a Length=the length of your hairline that you want flowers on and a Width=2xhow wide you want the headband (as shown in the diagram below) Simply sew fold it in half, sew the length and then turn it inside out (or alternatively use the Thick, Wide Ribbon)

Headband Diagram

Step 1. Amass your supplies of flowers. My suggestion is to pick one large flower as the centrepiece of the headband (in my case, the dull orange daisy at the front) and then have a combination of small flowers as ‘fillers’. I bought the yellow ones and gold silk roses for this purpose. You can also make your own flowers, like my red rose on the left.

Floral Headband- Step 1

Step 2: Cut the plastic stems off the flowers. We want the flowers to be as flat as possible so that we can sew them to the fabric strip with as much surface area as possible for security.

The hole where the hollow stem was attached will be a good place to sew the flower with, since there’s no plastic to puncture and also cetnres it

Floral Headband- Step 2

Step 3: Sew to fabric strip. As you can see, I used the orange flower as the main focal point, and used my red fabric rose as a wedge to angle it slightly, so that the daisy will be facing forward when you wear it. I then used he smaller flowers as filler, mosaic style. The roses came with wire stems, so if you don’t want to cut them off, you can just loop it around adjacent flowers. Experiment with your designs!

My method for sewing them was to use thread of a similar colour to the centre (i.e. the daisy centres were black) and sew through the aforementioned hole. The fewer holes you make in the plastic, the less likely they’ll merge together into bigger holes and weaken the base of your flowers.

The silk flowers came with wires attached, so instead of cutting the wires off, I just twisted them around surrounding flowers for added stability

Step 4: Attach elastic. I didn’t take any pictures for this, but it’s pretty straight forward. Measure your head around where you’ll wear it, and cut. Make sure to stretch the elastic slightly as you cut it, so that when you wear it, it’ll stretch and fit your head snuggly.

Et voila; aimes-tu mon nournours? ❤

Floral headband, teddy bear

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